ToursFromLondon

Top Attractions in London

  • Big Ben
    #1
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    The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, known as the Big Ben, is one of London's most famous landmarks. At the time the tower was built in 1858 its clock was the largest in the world. Read More...
  • Tower Bridge
    #2
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    London’s Tower Bridge is one of the most recognizable bridges in the world. Despite being disliked by many when it was built in 1894 the bridge soon became one of the London's most famous landmarks. Read More...
  • London Eye
    #3
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    The London Eye is a giant observation wheel in the center of London. Since its opening in 2000 the 30-minute 'flight' offers visitors great panoramic views over london. Read More...
  • Tower of London
    #4
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    The Tower of London was built at the end of the 11th century by William the Conqueror. The fortress houses a famous collection of jewelry including the Imperial State Crown. Read More...
  • Houses of Parliament
    #5
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    The Houses of Parliament, the seat of Britain's two parliamentary houses, was built in 1870. The enormous building is best known for its iconic clock Tower, the Big Ben. Read More...
  • Piccadilly Circus
    #6
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    Piccadilly Circus is one of London's busiest squares. Always buzzing with activity, the popular plaza is best known for its billboard advertisements and the Eros statue. Read More...
  • Trafalgar Square
    #7
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    The largest square in London is named after the Battle of Trafalgar where the English fleet defeated the French. The column at the center of the square honors Admiral Nelson who was fatally wounded during the battle. Read More...
  • Buckingham Palace
    #8
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    One of London's most popular tourist attractions, Buckingham Palace is the most famous of all the palaces in London. The palace is still used as the official residence of the Queen. Read More...
  • St. Paul's Cathedral
    #9
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    The majestic St. Paul's Cathedral was constructed between 1675 and 1711 by Christopher Wren who designed world's second largest dome; it was only eclipsed by the St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Read More...
  • Hyde Park
    #10
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    One of the most famous parks in the world, Hyde Park is a large green lung in the center of London. It first opened to the public in 1627. The park has lots of open space and a large lake. Read More...
  • Gherkin
    #11
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    The Gherkin, officially known by its street address 30 St. Mary Axe, is a 41 story skyscraper built in 2004 in the financial center of London. The building received several awards for its unique design. Read More...
  • Westminster Abbey
    #12
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    Construction of the Westminster Abbey started in 1050 and spanned 8 centuries. The abbey serves as a burial ground for many famous monarchs, scientists and artists. Read More...
  • Madame Tussauds
    #13
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    Madame Tussaud's display of wax figures has been fascinating visitors since the first exhibit was held in 1835. The museum is still one of the city's most popular attractions. Read More...
  • Harrods
    #14
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    London's most famous department store is a luxurious shopping paradise. Its lavish interior and enormous range of products will impress even the most shopping-averse visitor. Read More...
  • Queen Victoria Memorial
    #15
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    In 1911 the Victoria Memorial was built right in front of Buckingham Palace. It honors the late Queen Victoria, who reigned more than 60 years over the expansive British Empire. Read More...
  • British Museum
    #16
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    London's largest museum features one of the world's most impressive archeological collections. Its Parthenon Galleries and the impressive Egyptian collections are some of the highlights. Read More...
  • Covent Garden
    #17
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    This old square used to be the home of the largest fruit-and vegetable market in England, but it is now a very popular shopping, eating and entertainment area. Read More...
  • Natural History Museum
    #18
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    London's popular Natural History Museum, housed in a large 19th century landmark building, has an enormous collection of all things regarding life on earth. Read More...
  • National Gallery
    #19
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    The National Gallery is one of London's most important museums, with a collection of paintings spanning the period from the 13th to the 19th century. It is housed at Trafalgar Square, in an impressive neo-classical building. Read More...
  • Victoria & Albert Museum
    #20
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    One of London's most interesting museums has a large collection of over 4 million pieces. Founded in 1852, the museum's diverse exhibits focus mostly on decorative arts and design. Read More...
  • Millennium Bridge
    #21
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    The Millennium Bridge was built in 2000 across the river Thames. the pedestrian bridge connects the St. Paul's Cathedral with the Tate Modern Gallery on London's South Bank. Read More...
  • Globe Theatre
    #22
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    The Globe Theatre is a reconstruction of the original 16th century theatre building which was known for its association with Shakespeare and burnt down in 1613.Read More...
  • The City
    #23
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    The City, the historic center of London, is now London's financial center. In this area several interesting skyscrapers can be found, as well as the St. Paul's Cathedral and other historic buildings. Read More...
  • O2 Arena
    #24
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    This huge dome was built as part of London's millennium celebrations. After the millennium exhibition was held here in 2000, it was converted into a multifunctional complex. Read More...
  • Cleopatra's Needle
    #25
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    Installed at the London embankment in 1878, this almost 3500-year-old obelisk was originally located at the ancient city of Heliopolis in Egypt. It was presented as a gift to the city in 1819. Read More...
  • St. James's Palace
    #26
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    This brick palace was built by King Henry VIII between 1531 and 1536. It became the principal royal residence in 1702 when Whitehall Palace was destroyed by fire and Queen Anne moved to St. James. Read More...
  • London Aquarium
    #27
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    The London Aquarium is one of Europe's largest aquariums, with many large water tanks and an especially impressive collection of sharks. Read More...
  • Kensington Gardens
    #28
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    This large park in the center of London features the Kensington Palace and a bronze statue of Peter Pan. Originally a private royal park, it opened to the public in 1841. Read More...
  • Kew Gardens
    #29
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    of 64
    The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew are one of the world's most important botanical gardens with about 50,000 plant species and many historically significant buildings such as the Palm House and Temperate House. Read More...
  • Canary Wharf
    #30
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    of 64
    Canary Wharf is a modern high-rise business district located in the Docklands, one the site of the world's busiest port. Today it features some of London's tallest buildings. Read More...
  • Tate Modern
    #31
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    One of the world's most important collections of modern art is housed in a former power station building. The massive brick building is located at the south bank of the river Thames. Read More...
  • Admiralty Arch
    #32
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    This arch was built in 1911 by Aston Webb. It serves as a majestic buffer between the crowded Trafalgar Square and the Mall, the stately boulevard leading to Buckingham Palace. Read More...
  • Kensington Palace
    #33
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    of 64
    This palace in the Kensington Gardens was originally built in 1605. Several royals lived in this palace, including Queen Victoria, who was born here. Today the palace is partially open to the public. Read More...
  • Royal Mews
    #34
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    The British royal family still uses ceremonial state coaches, housed in the Royal Mews, near Buckingham Palace. The centrepiece of the mews is the ornately decorated 'Gold State Coach'. Read More...
  • HMS Belfast
    #35
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    This warship was brought into service just before the Second World War. It saw plenty of action until the ship became decommissioned in 1963. Today the ship is a floating naval museum. Read More...
  • Leicester Square
    #36
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    Leicester square is one of London's most lively squares situated in the heart of London's prime entertainment district. The abundance of theatres gives the area the nickname Theatreland. Read More...
  • City Hall
    #37
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    In 2002, the Mayor of London moved from the classic County Hall to this modern glass and steel structure. It houses the Greater London Authority, London's city government. Read More...
  • St. Pancras Station
    #38
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    St Pancras Station combines a historic Victorian train shed with an eye-catching neo-gothic building. The station is the terminus for the Eurostar High Speed Train, linking London with the European continent. Read More...
  • The Monument
    #39
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    This monument was erected in 1671 to commemorate the Great Fire of 1666, during which most of London burned to the ground. The monument was designed by the renowned architect Christopher Wren. Read More...
  • St. James's Park
    #40
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    of 64
    London's oldest royal park is one of the city's most romantic. The park was created in the 16th century by King Henry VIII when he built the nearby St. James's Palace.Read More...
  • Albert Memorial
    #41
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    This Memorial was commissioned by Queen Victoria as a tribute to her late consort, Prince Albert. The High Gothic monument was completed in 1876, 15 years after prince Albert died at the age of 41. Read More...
  • Marble Arch
    #42
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    This arch was built in 1827 by famed architect John Nash as the triumphal entrance gate to the newly expanded Buckingham Palace. The arch moved to its current position in 1851. Read More...
  • Greenwich
    #43
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    Greenwich is a district in Greater London that was once very popular with the Royal Family. Today it is best known for its Maritime Museum and the Greenwich Meridian, named after this historic area. Read More...
  • Cutty Sark
    #44
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    of 64
    The Cutty Sark is a beautiful historic clipper ship, now a permanent museum in Greenwich. Built in 1869, it is the only remaining tea clipper ship from the 19th century. Read More...
  • Royal Albert Hall
    #45
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    London's historical entertainment hall was built in 1871 in honor of Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's husband and consort. The red brick building was renovated in 2004. Read More...
  • Imperial War Museum
    #46
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    This national museum extensively covers the 20th century conflicts in which Great Britain was involved, with an emphasis on the two World Wars. It is housed in a former hospital building. Read More...
  • Albert Bridge
    #47
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    Connecting Chelsea with Battersea across the Thames, this colorful historic bridge in Victorian Style was built in 1872. It is named in memory of Prince Albert, Prince Consort to Queen Victoria. Read More...
  • Leadenhall Market
    #48
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    of 64
    Leadenhall Market is a glass-covered shopping gallery, created in the 19th century in a Victorian design. Originally a food market, today you'll find a wide assortment of shops and restaurants. Read More...
  • Hyde Park Corner
    #49
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    A collection of statues, monuments and memorials can be found at this traffic island located at the southeast tip of Hyde Park. Apsley House, the home of the first Duke of Wellington, is also located here. Read More...
  • Regent's Park
    #50
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    Originally a hunting ground for King Henry VIII, Regent's Park is now one of London's largest and most popular parks thanks to its lake, beautiful gardens and its London Zoo. Read More...
  • Westminster Cathedral
    #51
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    This Roman Catholic church is located at a small piazza near Victoria Station. Its red and white brick byzantine architecture sets it apart from the many other, mostly gothic churches in London. Read More...
  • Cumberland Terrace
    #52
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    This magnificent group of neo-classical buildings was just one of many such terraces built in the early 19th century as part of a large development project, transforming an area now known as Regency London. Read More...
  • Russell Square
    #53
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    Once the garden of the Earl of Bedford, this square with quiet park in Bloomsbury is lined with historic buildings, most notably the impressive Russell Hotel, built in 1900. Read More...
  • Lloyd's Building
    #54
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    of 64
    When the design of this futuristic office tower was unveiled in 1978 it caused quite a stir, but today the Lloyd's Building is considered one of the first truly groundbreaking modern buildings in London. Read More...
  • Wellington Arch
    #55
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    This triumphal arch commemorates the Duke of Wellington's Victory over Napoleon in Waterloo. The arch was constructed in 1830 just south of Hyde Park. Read More...
  • Liberty
    #56
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    This famous London department store, originally founded in 1875, is housed in a magnificent neo-Tudor style building, built specifically as a warehouse in 1924.Read More...
  • Battersea Park
    #57
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    This 200 acres / 81ha large park just south of the Thames opened in 1858. One of the attractions in the park is a Buddhist pagoda built in 1985 and known as the Temple of Peace. Read More...
  • Brompton Oratory
    #58
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    This domed Italianate church - the second largest Roman Catholic church in London - was built in the 19th century for the congregation of the London Oratory.Read More...
  • Royal Courts of Justice
    #59
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    The High Court of England and Wales is housed in this magnificent Victorian Gothic building. The immense building opened in 1882, shortly after its architect died. Read More...
  • County Hall
    #60
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    of 64
    The majestic County Hall was long used as the home of the Greater London Council. In the 1990s the building was privatized and became home to the London Aquarium. Read More...
  • Royal Opera House
    #61
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    Built in 1858, this is the third opera house at this location near the Covent Garden Market after the first two were lost to fire. When it opened the building was lauded for its spectacular glass and iron arcade. Read More...
  • Holland Park
    #62
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    Holland park was created in 1952 from what was left of the enormous estate of Holland House, a large mansion originally built in the early 17th century in West London. Read More...
  • Guildhall
    #63
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    The history of the Guildhall goes back to the early 15th century, when it was built as the home of the Corporation of London, a governing body of the City of London. Inside are a number of magnificent halls. Read More...
  • National Portrait Gallery
    #64
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    Now encompassing thousands of paintings and photographs, the National Portrait Gallery was established in 1856 with a collection of paintings of British heroes that was meant to inspire the common people. Read More...